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HHS Awards $3.4 Million in Grants for New Family-Centered Type 2 Diabetes Control and Prevention Initiative

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 7, 2021
Contact: Contact: OASH Press Office
202-205-0143
ashmedia@hhs.gov

HHS Awards $3.4 Million in Grants for New Family-Centered Type 2 Diabetes Control and Prevention Initiative

Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) announced $3.4 million in grant awards to seven organizations for a new initiative to test interventions to identify family-centered factors that promote self-management and prevention of Type 2 diabetes among racial and ethnic minority and disadvantaged families who have a member(s) aged 12 and older with Type 2 diabetes.

“Family members can be instrumental in ensuring patients with Type 2 diabetes adopt, tailor, and sustain healthy behaviors that support effective self-management,” said Assistant Secretary for Health Rachel L. Levine, M.D. “By identifying effective family-centered approaches, we can not only help people with Type 2 diabetes, but we can also elevate the importance of working in partnership with entire families and multiple generations in maintaining good health practices.”

Through the testing of family-centered interventions, OMH expects the Family-Centered Approaches to Improving Type 2 Diabetes Control and Prevention initiative to identify specific family-centered factors (e.g., structural, functional, and cultural) that affect patient self-management of diabetes (e.g., physical activity and healthy nutrition) and family members' health outcomes.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not make enough insulin (a hormone made by the pancreas), which helps the body use glucose and control blood glucose levels. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 34 million people in the United States (about 1 in 10) have diabetes and approximately 90-95% of them have Type 2 diabetes.

“Racial and ethnic minority populations are more likely to experience the worst outcomes due to diabetes, including end-stage renal disease and death,” said RADM Felicia Collins, M.D., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and OMH Director. “With a focus on health promotion across families, this initiative can help identify practices for preventing those outcomes and reducing disparities.”

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults is highest among American Indians/Alaska Natives (14.7%), people of Hispanic origin (12.5%), and non-Hispanic Blacks (11.7%), followed by non-Hispanic Asians (9.2%) and non-Hispanic Whites (7.5%). Type 2 diabetes also disproportionally affects racial and ethnic minority youth and young adults.

The seven new grantees will conduct projects in Arkansas, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and Washington. The project period for the Family-Centered Approaches to Improving Type 2 Diabetes Control and Prevention Program began on September 30, 2021.

The awardees are:

Award Recipients Award Amount
Asian Health Coalition $499,493.00
Brookland Center for Community Economic Change $500,000.00
Central Oklahoma American Indian Health Council, Inc. $499,745.85
Denver Indian Health and Family Services $416,057.00
Family Health International $499,799.31
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences $499,520.00
The University of Texas at Austin $486,808.00
Total: $ 3,401,423.16

For more information about OMH, visit www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov.

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) is dedicated to improving the health of racial and ethnic minority populations through the development of health policies and programs that will help eliminate health disparities.

10/7/2021 2:56:00 PM