Behavioral Health

Addressing behavioral health is an important part of wellness. Visit OMH’s Black/African American Population Profile to learn more about the disparities affecting the community. Use this page to learn more about famous Black men and women who helped advance the field and for resources on addressing behavioral health.

Contributions from Black Doctors & Scholars

Margaret Cornelia Morgan Lawrence, M.D. (1914-2019) was a pioneer in child psychiatry and, in 1948, became the first Black woman to both complete a residency at the New York Psychiatric Institute and be certified in psychoanalysis at Columbia University's Columbia Psychoanalytic Center.

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Solomon Fuller, M.D. Exit Disclaimer (1872-1953) was the first Black psychiatrist and a pioneer in Alzheimer’s research. Dr. Fuller was instrumental in recruiting and training Black psychiatrists for key positions when the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs opened the Tuskegee Veterans Administration after World War I with an entirely Black staff.

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Kenneth Bancroft Clark, Ph.D. Exit Disclaimer (1914-2005) was the first Black president of the American Psychological Association and, along with Mamie Phipps Clark, created the “Doll Study” to study the psychological effects of segregation on Black children.

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Mamie Phipps Clark, Ph.D. Exit Disclaimer (1917-1983) was the first Black woman to earn a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Columbia University and, along with Dr. Kenneth Bancroft Clark, created the “Doll Study” to study the psychological effects of segregation on Black children.

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Resources

Federal Resources