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Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU)

Grantee Information

  • Grantee Organization Name:Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU)
  • Organization Address (Street, City, State, Zip): 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239
  • Organization website URL (if any):www.ohsu.edu/xd/ Exit Disclaimer
  • Brief Description of the Organization: OHSU is the state of Oregon’s only public health and research university. OHSU strives to meet workforce shortages in the health and science professions across Oregon. OHSU also hopes to develop policy and care delivery solutions that make it possible for all Oregonians to have access to high-quality healthcare. OHSU values partnerships with communities, industry, other colleges and universities, and private citizens to develop community-based solutions to community problems.

Grant Project Information

  1. Title of Grant Project: Nurturing Healthy and Empowered Youth in American Indian Communities (HEY)
  2. Amount of OMH Award: $300,000
  3. Name of Project Director: Dr. William Lambert

Brief Description of the Grant Project

The Nurturing Healthy and Empowered Youth in American Indian Communities (HEY) project was a curriculum-based intervention that incorporated American Indian tradition and culture to educate American Indian youth, ages 12-15 years, living on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation near Pocatello, Idaho on topics including responsible behavior, substance abuse, healthy relationships (including intimate partner violence), prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and prevention of teen pregnancy. The project aimed to increase the students’ understanding of the Native Students Together Against Negative Decisions (STAND) curricula and academic skills every month, and build life skills in self-awareness, critical thinking, problem-solving, communication, and media literacy. Youth were involved in the production of youth video films and public service announcements, and prevention-focused documentaries which incorporated Shoshoni language and traditional cultural practices and concepts.

The project implemented the comprehensive Native STAND curriculum comprising 28 units with a strong focus on STD, HIV, teen pregnancy, drug and alcohol issues AND dating violence, delivered during school hours. The grant project trained youth participants in media literacy and filmmaking activities, providing these youth with new skills and an outlet for communicating health messages to their peers and community members. The grant project distributed community awareness materials that were created with the program participants. The grant project offered academic support and tutoring during school hours and after-school hours. Students participated in community service events and projects, and in sports and cultural activities. The grant project encouraged students to participate in leadership roles in the community and among their peers by serving as peer educators, assuming leadership roleS among their peers, and voicing youths’ needs and concerns before the tribal leadership and other adults in the community. The intervention is provided through the Tribe’s Department of Health and Human Services and through the Shoshone-Bannock Junior/Senior High School, along with several other community networks.

Evaluation support was provided by the evaluation team at the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board. Specific methods for collecting and analyzing data on measures included pre- and post-surveys to measure changes over time, health educator assessments, qualitative assessments of participants’ experiences, focus group interviews with the health educators, and a comparison of school records and other administrative data over time. Community Advisory Committee members, tribal advisors, and Indian Health Service National STD Program advisors provided guidance and expertise on all phases of the project to ensure a culturally tailored and appropriate intervention for the participants. Outcome measures included delayed initiation of sex, increased knowledge of STDs, and increased ethnic pride.

Key program findings reported throughout the grant period:

  1. Increased student self-esteem. Students showed high scores in the areas of “positive emotions and self-worth,” with positive increases in the percentage of girls and boys reporting excellent or good mental health (45 percent to 59 percent for girls and 62 percent to 70 percent for boys) from pre-/post-survey results.
  2. Improvements in “health supporting behaviors.” Pre-/post-tests showed behavior modification from the start to the end of the school year, particularly in the areas of physical and mental health, condom use, and STD testing. During focus groups, students demonstrated that they had increased their knowledge in the area of sexual health and drug and alcohol use as a result of the HEY project. Both males and females are reporting the use of condoms and screening for sexually transmitted infections(STIs).
  3. Film-making skills of students developed. The students have uploaded their films to YouTube and Facebook and have presented them at large conferences and meetings. The film-making aspect of the program has helped reinforce the students’ self-esteem and leadership, and also allows them to explore and expand on their sense of identity. The films also help reinforce the concepts and health messages that the students receive and learn about through the project.
  4. Increased awareness and knowledge of heath and healthy behavior.High school girls participating in the project reported dramatic increases in condom use (18 percent pre-, 45 percent post-test) and STI testing (18 percent pre-, 27 percent post-test). Students demonstrated a decrease in smoking from pre- to post-test (49 percent to 34.5 percent for girls and 62 percent to 59 percent for boys).

Identified Best Practices

  • Integration of Project with the School Day.The project has had exceptional success with retention by integrating with the students’ regular school day; the project is offered as a health elective that counts toward a graduation requirement for the students in the school. In addition, the two health educators for the program are teachers at the school and are well-liked and respected by the students, adding to the program’s success among the students.
  • Media Literacy and Dissemination.Through the media literacy unit, students have learned valuable skills, such as operating video cameras and sound equipment, using video editing and music production software, and filming techniques, such as lighting, camera angles, interviewing, animations, storyboarding, and camera positioning. Students have produced films to promote the health and cultural messages that they learn in class and have posted them on websites like YouTube and Facebook, where their videos have been well received. The students have also been invited to present their films at nationwide film conferences.
  • Community Involvement.Two HEY students have become involved with the Wellness Center planning committee and several HEY students are documenting the planning process through film.
  • New Funding Opportunities.The project and HEY data are also being used to seek new funding and expand the intervention to other tribes in Washington State, Oregon, and Idaho. The proposed project will implement and evaluate a culturally-appropriate curricula to prevent drug and alcohol use among American Indian and Alaska Native youth in the Pacific Northwest. The project will combine healthy decision-making curricula with hands-on training in filmmaking and media development.

Related National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities Goals

  • Health System and Life Experience: Improve health and healthcare outcomes for racial and ethnic minorities and for underserved populations and communities

Related Healthy People 2020 Objectives & Subobjectives

  • STD-1.1 Reduce the proportion of females aged 15 to 24 years with Chlamydia trachomatis infections attending family planning clinics
  • STD-3.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 16 to 20 years enrolled in Medicaid plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year
  • STD-4.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 16 to 20 years enrolled in commercial health insurance plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year
  • STD-5 Reduce the proportion of females aged 15 to 44 years who have ever required treatment for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • STD-7.1 Reduce sustained domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among females
  • STD-7.2 Reduce sustained domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among males
  • SA-2.1 Increase the proportion of at risk adolescents aged 12 to 17 years who, in the past year, refrained from using alcohol for the first time
  • SA-2.2 Increase the proportion of at risk adolescents aged 12 to 17 years who, in the past year, refrained from using marijuana for the first time
  • SA-2.3 Increase the proportion of high school seniors never using substances - Alcoholic beverages
  • SA-2.4 Increase the proportion of high school seniors never using substances - Illicit drugs
  • SA-3.1 Increase the proportion of adolescents who disapprove of having one or two alcoholic drinks nearly every day - 8th graders
  • SA-3.2 Increase the proportion of adolescents who disapprove of having one or two alcoholic drinks nearly every day - 10th graders
  • SA-3.3 Increase the proportion of adolescents who disapprove of having one or two alcoholic drinks nearly every day - 12th graders
  • SA-3.4 Increase the proportion of adolescents who disapprove of trying marijuana or hashish once or twice - 8th graders
  • SA-3.5 Increase the proportion of adolescents who disapprove of trying marijuana or hashish once or twice - 10th graders
  • SA-3.6 Increase the proportion of adolescents who disapprove of trying marijuana or hashish once or twice - 12th graders
  • SA-4.1 Increase the proportion of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years perceiving great risk associated with substance abuse - Consuming five or more alcoholic drinks at a single occasion once or twice a week
  • SA-4.2 Increase the proportion of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years perceiving great risk associated with substance abuse - Smoking marijuana once per month
  • SA-4.3 Increase the proportion of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years perceiving great risk associated with substance abuse - Using cocaine once per month
  • SA-13.1 Reduce the proportion of adolescents reporting use of alcohol or any illicit drugs during the past 30 days
  • SA-13.2 Reduce the proportion of adolescents reporting use of marijuana during the past 30 days
  • SA-14.1 Reduce the proportion of students engaging in binge drinking during the past two weeks - High school seniors
  • SA-14.4 Reduce the proportion of persons engaging in binge drinking during the past month - Adolescents aged 12 to 17 years
  • SA-19.1 Reduce the past-year nonmedical use of pain relievers
  • SA-19.2 Reduce the past-year nonmedical use of tranquilizers
  • SA-19.3 Reduce the past-year nonmedical use of stimulants
  • SA-19.4 Reduce the past-year nonmedical use of sedatives
  • SA-19.5 Reduce the past-year nonmedical use of any psychotherapeutic drug (including pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives)
  • SA-21 Reduce the proportion of adolescents who use inhalants
  • IVP-34 Reduce physical fighting among adolescents
  • IVP-35 Reduce bullying among adolescents
  • IVP-41 Reduce nonfatal intentional self-harm injuries
  • IVP-42 Reduce children’s exposure to violence



Content Last Modified: 8/14/2013 12:02:00 PM
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