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Lutheran Family Health Centers

Grantee Information

  1. Grantee Organization Name: Lutheran Family Health Centers
  2. Organization Address (Street, City, State, Zip): 150 55th Street, New York, NY 11220
  3. Organization website URL (if any): www.lutheranmedicalcenter.com Exit Disclaimer
  4. Brief Description of the Organization: Lutheran Family Health Centers is a network of providers that delivers health services to over 90,000 active patients residing in neighborhoods in southwest Brooklyn, NY. In particular, Lutheran utilizes bicultural and cross-trained providers to meet the growing racial and ethnic diversity of Brooklyn.

Grant Project Information

  1. Title of Grant Project: Project SAFE (Speak out on AIDS Facts and Education)
  2. Amount of OMH Award: $247,874
  3. Name of Project Director: Rebecca Gallager
  4. Brief Description of the Grant Project

    African American youth in Brooklyn, NY are disproportionately impacted by HIV. Lutheran Family Health Centers, a network of providers, implemented Project SAFE to promote HIV awareness and prevention among at-risk African American youth in Brooklyn. Key strategies of the project included using peer educators to communicate with the target population, providing individual risk- reduction counseling, adopting a technologically advanced referral system to direct youth to appropriate health and social services and track their use of those services, and facilitating access to opportunities for HIV testing and education (e.g., workshops were held at community events). The HIV education workshops were youth-driven and used creative and culturally relevant communication strategies (e.g., dance and poetry) to inform participants about the importance of safe sex.

    The project aimed to increase understanding of how HIV is transmitted, and how transmission can be prevented. It also sought to increase awareness of risky behaviors that increase susceptibility of contracting the virus and to improve continuity of care for HIV-infected youth. Lutheran Family Health Centers anticipated that a trained group of 75 peer educators who are representative of the target population would provide HIV prevention workshops to 400 at-risk youth within the first year of funding, and 350 youth would be referred for supplementary health care and social services over the course of the project. The grantee also set out to provide on-site testing to at least 360 youth.

    Lutheran Family Health Centers reported using a pre-post design to conduct a process and outcome evaluation and assess the extent to which project activities influenced the target population. A key data source, the Complementary Strengths Survey was administered before and after training workshops in order to collect qualitative data from peer educators. Additionally, participant data pertaining to testing and referrals was tracked through E-clinical Works, an electronic medical record database.

    Key program findings reported throughout the grant period indicated:

    1. Increased general HIV/AIDS knowledge and awareness. Evidence from single session workshops revealed that 82 percent of participants were knowledgeable about how to access sexual health resources (N=2,961).
    2. Increased knowledge of HIV status. Over the course of the project, 666 people were tested and given their results. There were no positive results. The number of youth tested was 185 percent above the original goal.
    3. Decreased risky behaviors. Data from single session workshops showed that 66 percent of youth participants were more likely to practice safer sex post- intervention (N=2,961). Evidence from community events revealed that 52 percent of attendees reported feeling more comfortable with getting HIV testing (N=995) and post-test results showed that 53 percent of youth (N=2,961) reported that they felt more comfortable talking about condom use with their partner.
    4. Increased continuity of care and services for HIV infected youth. Roughly 73 percent of youth who were referred to social/health services received them (N=1,060). This was more than three times the original target for number of referrals.
    5. Use of social media enhanced outreach efforts. The project's Facebook page received 2,513 unique visits, and the blog had 2,892 unique visitors.

    Identified Best Practices

    • Follow-up of health care and social services referrals. When youth were referred to health care and social service clinics or agencies, the Project SAFE team followed up with youth to ensure appointment attendance. The project utilized multiple modes of technology, such as texting and mobile applications, to remind youth of their referrals, appointments; and treatment. For example, if birth control pill use was prescribed at the clinic appointment, Project SAFE could send a text reminder for medication compliance or help the client use an application to assist with reminders.
    • Comprehensive evaluation with continuous quality improvements. The Project SAFE utilized a consultant to assist in their evaluation. In addition to utilizing the Complementary Strengths survey and eClinical Works (an EMR) for process and outcome measurement, there were continuous quality improvements driven by the data
    • Multi-pronged approach to reach the greatest number of youth. Project SAFE utilized three critical elements in order to reach the largest number of youth including intensive work with peer counselors, prevention and education workshops, and large community events. Using multiple approaches increased the reach of the intervention beyond youth who were willing to take part as peer educators.

    National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities Goals

    • Leadership: Strengthen and broaden leadership for addressing health disparities at all levels.
    • Health System and Life Experience: Improve health and health care outcomes for racial and ethnic minorities and for underserved populations and communities.
    • Data, Research, and Evaluation: Improve data availability and coordination, utilization, and diffusion of research and evaluation outcomes.

    Related Healthy People 2020 Objectives & Subobjectives

    • AH-1 Increase the proportion of adolescents who have had a wellness checkup in the past 12 months
    • AH-2 Increase the proportion of adolescents who participate in extracurricular and out-of-school activities
    • AH-3.2 Increase the proportion of parents who attend events and activities in which their adolescents participate
    • HIV-3 Reduce the rate of HIV transmission among adolescents and adults
    • HIV-4 Reduce new AIDS cases among adolescents and adults
    • HIV-5 Reduce new AIDS cases among adolescent and adult heterosexuals
    • HIV-6 Reduce new AIDS cases among adolescent and adult men who have sex with men
    • HIV-12 Reduce deaths from HIV infection
    • HIV-13 Increase the proportion of people living with HIV who know their serostatus
    • HIV-14.1 Increase the proportion of adolescents and adults who have been tested for HIV in the past 12 months
    • HIV-14.4 Increase the proportion of adolescents and young adults who have been tested for HIV in the past 12 months
    • HIV-17.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active unmarried females aged 15 to 44 years who use condoms
    • HIV-17.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active unmarried males aged 15 to 44 years who use condoms
    • FP-1 Increase the proportion of pregnancies that are intended
    • FP-6 Increase the proportion of females or their partners at risk of unintended pregnancy who used contraception at most recent sexual intercourse
    • FP-7.1 Increase the proportion of sexually experienced females aged 15 to 44 years who received reproductive health services in the past 12 months
    • FP-7.2 Increase the proportion of sexually experienced males aged 15 to 44 years who received reproductive health services
    • FP-8.2 Reduce pregnancies among adolescent females aged 18 to 19 years
    • FP-10.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom at first intercourse
    • FP-10.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom at first intercourse
    • FP-10.3 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom at last intercourse
    • FP-10.4 Increase the proportion of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom at last intercourse
    • FP-11.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom and hormonal or intrauterine contraception at first intercourse
    • FP-11.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom and hormonal or intrauterine contraception at first intercourse
    • FP-11.3 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom and hormonal or intrauterine contraception at last intercourse
    • FP-11.4 Increase the proportion of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom and hormonal or intrauterine contraception at last intercourse
    • FP-12.1 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who received formal instruction on abstinence before they were 18 years old
    • FP-12.2 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who received formal instruction on abstinence before they were 18 years old
    • FP-12.3 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who received formal instruction on birth control methods before they were 18 years old
    • FP-12.4 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who received formal instruction on birth control methods before they were 18 years old
    • FP-12.5 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who received formal instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention before they were 18 years old
    • FP-12.6 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who received formal instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention before they were 18 years old
    • FP-12.7 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who received formal instruction on sexually transmitted diseases before they were 18 years old
    • FP-12.8 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who received formal instruction on sexually transmitted diseases before they were 18 years old
    • FP-13.1 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about abstinence before they were 18 years old
    • FP-13.2 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about abstinence before they were 18 years old
    • FP-13.3 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about birth control methods before they were 18 years old
    • FP-13.4 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about birth control methods before they were 18 years old
    • FP-13.5 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about HIV/AIDS prevention before they were 18 years old
    • FP-13.6 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about HIV/AIDS prevention before they were 18 years old
    • FP-13.7 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about sexually transmitted diseases before they were 18 years old
    • FP-13.8 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about sexually transmitted diseases before they were 18 years old



Content Last Modified: 8/13/2013 12:14:00 PM
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