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External linkpdf file CDC Releases 2011 Health Disparities and Inequalities Report [PDF | 3MB]
The report highlights health disparities by varying demographic characteristics, the need for more data and how disparities translate to a person's quality of life over the lifespan
External link AHRQ: Disparities in Care Persist
Reports from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that although improvements in the quality of care are being made, gaps based on race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status continue to persist.
External link Health, United States, 2009
Health, United States is an annual report on trends in health statistics. The report consists of two main sections: A chartbook containing text and figures that illustrates major trends in the health of Americans; and a trend tables section that contains 156 detailed data tables. The two main components are supplemented by an executive summary, a highlights section, an extensive appendix and reference section, and an index.
External link National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2006
Racial/ethnic group comparison focus on 22 core measures of quality and 6 core measures of access that support reliable estimates for Whites, Blacks, Asians, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Hispanics; income group comparisons highlight 17 core quality measures and 6 core access measures.
External link National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2005
This annual report provides a comprehensive national overview of disparities in health care among racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups in the general U.S. population and within priority populations and tracks the success of activities to reduce disparities.
External link National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2004
The National Healthcare Disparities Report (NHDR) is an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-led effort on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and is the product of collaboration among the agencies of HHS.
External link National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2003
The National Healthcare Disparities Report (NHDR) is an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-led effort on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and is the product of collaboration among the agencies of HHS.
External link Health, United States, 2006
Health, United States is an annual report on trends in health statistics. The report consists of two main sections: A chartbook containing text and figures that illustrates major trends in the health of Americans; and a trend tables section that contains 156 detailed data tables. The two main components are supplemented by an executive summary, a highlights section, an extensive appendix and reference section, and an index.
External linkpdf file Health, United States, 2005
Health, United States is an annual report on trends in health statistics. The report consists of two main sections: A chartbook containing text and figures that illustrates major trends in the health of Americans; and a trend tables section that contains 156 detailed data tables. The two main components are supplemented by an executive summary, a highlights section, an extensive appendix and reference section, and an index.
External link Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Infant Mortality --- United States, 1995--2002
A national health objective for the year 2000 was to reduce the infant mortality rate (IMR) in the United States to 7.0 deaths per 1,000 live births among infants aged <1 year (1,2). The national health objective for 2010 targets a rate of 4.5 infant deaths per 1,000 live births (3); an overarching goal calls for eliminating disparities among racial and ethnic populations. To examine racial and ethnic disparities in IMRs, data were analyzed from the National Vital Statistics System for the period 1995--2002. IMRs were calculated by race/ethnicity of the mother in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC).
External link QuickStats: Life Expectancy at Birth, by Year --- United States, 1970--2003
Preliminary data indicate that life expectancy at birth in the United States reached a record high in 2003. Disparities in life expectancy at birth between non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white persons and males and females have narrowed in recent years.
External link Improving the Collection and Use of Racial and Ethnic Data in HHS - Joint Report of the HHS Data Council Working Group on Racial and Ethnic Data and The Data Work Group of the HHS Initiative to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has long recognized the serious gaps in its information systems and databases regarding racial and ethnic data, and has established various work groups over the years to document problems and develop solutions. As a result, numerous HHS reports have identified problems with racial and ethnic data and have proposed recommendations. While a number of improvements have been made in racial and ethnic data, serious gaps remain.
pdf file Volume I: Executive Summary, Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Black & Minority Health (1985) [PDF | 35MB]
The first volume of the Task Force Report summarizes the information and data compiled on specific minority health problems, special reports developed on cross-cutting minority health issues, and recommendations proposing activities for a coordinated effort by which DHHS may redirect its resources to address the demonstrated disparity in health status between minority and nonminority populations.
Letter to Secretary Thompson on Populations-Based Data for Racial and Ethnic Minorities
For almost four decades, the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics ( NCVHS ) has monitored and advised your office on important initiatives to improve population-based data for racial and ethnic minorities... Most recently, the NCVHS established a Subcommittee on Populations with the charge of focusing on ( a ) population-based health data concerning the U. S. population generally and ( b ) data about specific vulnerable groups within the population that are disadvantaged by virtue of their special health needs, economic status, race, ethnicity, langage, disability, age, or area of residence... The Subcommittee also serves as a public forum for discussions on the use of race and ethnicity categories in health data and whether the data collected by federal agencies are sufficient to determine whether health disparities exist in racial and ethnic groups, in support of efforts to eliminate those disparities...
External link Surveillance for Health Behaviors of American Indians and Alaska Natives: Findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1997-2000
Problem/Condition: In the United States, disparities in risks for chronic disease (e.g., diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are evident among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) and other groups. This report summarizes findings from the 1997-2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for health-status indicators, health-risk behaviors, and HIV testing and perceived risk for HIV infection among AI/ANs, compared with other racial/ethnic groups in five regions of the United States.
External linkpdf file Health Disparities Experienced by American Indians and Alaska Natives
This issue of MMWR describes disparities in health for certain preventable health conditions (i.e., diabetes, cancer, bronchiolitis, and injuries) among AI/ANs.
External linkpdf file US Census 2000 Brief: The Hispanic Population
This report, part of a series that analyzes population and housing data collected by Census 2000, provides a profile of the Hispanic population in the United States.
External linkpdf file A Demographic and Health Snapshot of the U.S. Hispanic/Latino Population National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
A report from Department of Health and Human Services Centers For Disease Control and Prevention.
External link QuickStats: Percentage of Persons Who Lacked Health Insurance Coverage for More Than 1 Year*, by Race/Ethnicity --- United States, January--June 2004
During January--June 2004, 10% of persons of all ages and approximately 28% of Hispanics had been without health insurance coverage for more than 1 year. Hispanics were more than four times as likely as non-Hispanic whites and approximately 2.5 times as likely as non-Hispanic blacks to have been uninsured for more than 1 year.
External linkpdf file We The People: Hispanics in the United States. (Released December 17, 2004)
This report provides a portrait of the Hispanic-origin population in the United States and discusses some of the Hispanic or Latino groups within this population at the national level. It is part of the Census 2000 Special Reports series that presents several demographic, social, and economic characteristics collected from Census 2000.
External linkpdf file We The People: Asians in the United States. (Released December 15, 2004)
This report provides a portrait of the Asian population in the United States and discusses the eleven largest detailed Asian groups at the national level, for example: Asian Indian, Cambodian, and Japanese.1 It is part of the Census 2000 Special Reports series that presents several demographic, social, and economic characteristics collected from Census 2000.
External link Racial Disparities in Nationally Notifiable Diseases --- United States, 2002
Infectious diseases are a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and disability in the United States and often affect racial/ethnic populations disproportionately (1,2). Eliminating racial disparities is a goal of many of the national health objectives for 2010 (3). To estimate racial disparities in the incidence of nationally notifiable infectious diseases by race/ethnicity, CDC reviewed 2002 data from the Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), collected through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that incidence rates were at least two times greater for blacks than whites for eight of 42 nationally notifiable diseases; however, substantial gaps exist in the reporting of racial/ethnic data for the 42 diseases, which accounted for approximately 1.3 million of the cases reported by NNDSS. Public health practitioners and policy makers might use these results to address disparities in disease rates among blacks and other racial/ethnic populations, but they also should work to close gaps in data reporting to accurately measure progress toward achieving the national health objectives.
External link Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Prevalence, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension --- United States, 1999--2002
During 1990--2000, the prevalence of hypertension, the percentage of those with hypertension who were aware of their condition, and treatment and control of hypertension increased among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics (6,7). CDC analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) for 1999--2002. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which determined that racial/ethnic disparities in awareness of, treatment for, and control of hypertension persist. If national health objectives are to be met, public health efforts must continue to focus on the prevention of HBP and must improve awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension among minority populations.
External link Differences in Disability Among Black and White Stroke Survivors --- United States, 2000--2001
External link Health Disparities Experienced by Black or African Americans --- United States
In the 2000 census, 36.4 million persons, approximately 12.9% of the U.S. population, identified themselves as Black or African American; 35.4 million of these persons identified themselves as non-Hispanic (1). For many health conditions, non-Hispanic blacks bear a disproportionate burden of disease, injury, death, and disability. Although the top three causes and seven of the 10 leading causes of death are the same for non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites (the largest racial/ethnic population in the United States), the risk factors and incidence, morbidity, and mortality rates for these diseases and injuries often are greater among blacks than whites. In addition, three of the 10 leading causes of death for non-Hispanic blacks are not among the leading causes of death for non-Hispanic whites: homicide (sixth), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease (seventh), and septicemia (ninth) (Table). This week's MMWR is the third in a series* focusing on racial/ethnic health disparities. Eliminating these disparities will require culturally appropriate public health initiatives, community support, and equitable access to quality health care.
External link Pediatric HIV/AIDS Surveillance [L262 slide series]
Set of 12 slides on pediatric HIV/AIDS surveillance.



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